Alabama

According to Alabama Law, any person who knows or has reasonable cause to believe or suspect that a child has been abused or neglected or who observes any child being subjected to conditions or circumstances that would reasonably result in abuse shall be required to report orally, either by telephone or direct communication immediately, followed by a written report, to DHR, law enforcement, or the District Attorney.

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Protection of Reporters “Any employer, public or private, who discharges, suspends, disciplines, or penalizes an employee solely for making a report of child abuse or neglect is guilty of a Class C misdemeanor.” Penalties for not reporting Failure to make a required report is a misdemeanor punishable by six months in jail or a $500 fine (or both); additional civil liabilities may be pursued.

When must a report be made? Reports must be made immediately after suspicion that child abuse or neglect is occurring or has occurred. A report can be made by either telephone or direct contact. Mandatory reporters must follow up with a written report to the Department of Human Resources. Reports may also be made to law enforcement officials, for example, local police departments, the District Attorney, or sheriffs’ offices.

Methods of reporting · U. S. mail · Faxed information · Telephone · Walk-ins

Important Information to Include · The name of the child · Current location of the child · County of residence · Extent of injuries or information that led to knowledge of or suspicious event that led to report · Age of child · Address of child and parents or guardian if known The

Department of Human Resources provides forms: Written Report of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (DHR-FCS-1593) for making reports of suspected child abuse and/or neglect (CAN). Individuals considered Mandatory Reporters are required to make written reports and should use CAN forms. Forms are available through the county and state offices of the Department of Human Resources. (This form is available at the Alabama Department of Human Resources, (334) 242-9500 or also available for completion and www.dhr.alabama.gov). Ref: Alabama Code 26-14-3— Mandatory Reporting in Alabama

MRT: https://aldhr.remote-learner.net/

Alaska

On June 30, 2017 a new category of Mandatory Reporters came into effect stating “Volunteers who interact with children in a public or private school for 4 or more hours a week are also Mandated Reporters.”

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State law (A.S. 47.17.020) requires that persons who are mandatory reporters who, in the performance of their occupational duties have reasonable cause to suspect that a child has suffered harm as a result of child abuse or neglect, shall immediately report the harm. A.S. 47.17.290 defines “reasonable cause to suspect” as “based on all the facts and circumstances known to the person that would lead a reasonable person to believe that something might be the case.” It does not matter how long ago the act happened, where it happened, or whether or not it is believed that it happened. Mandated reporters must report suspected abuse or neglect immediately, which means as soon as reasonably possible and no later than within 24 hours.

State law (A.S. 47.17.068) and federal law (18 U.S.C. 1169) provide for criminal penalties for failing to comply with the obligation to report suspected abuse or neglect. State law (A.S. 47.17.050) and federal law (18 U.S.C. 1169) also provide that a person who complies with their obligations and makes a report in good faith is immune from civil or criminal liability.

MRT: http://training.dhss.alaska.gov/mandatoryreporter/training/multiscreen.html

Arizona

Any person who reasonably believes that a minor is or has been the victim of physical injury, abuse, child abuse, a reportable offense or neglect that appears to have been inflicted on the minor by other than accidental means…shall immediately report or cause reports to be made of this information to a peace officer or to Child Protective Services…

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physical injury, abuse, child abuse, a reportable offense or neglect that appears to have been inflicted on the minor by other than accidental means…shall immediately report or cause reports to be made of this information to a peace officer or to Child Protective Services in the Department of Economic Security, except if the report concerns a person who does not have care, custody or control of the minor, the report shall be made to a peace officer only. (Arizona Revised Statute 13-3620)

 

Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse

Online Training

Presented by

The Arizona Governor’s Office – Children’s Justice Programs

This FREE training consists of 4 modules, with information and 4 short videos; it should take approximately 2 hours to get through. You will not be able to log out and log back in if you run out of time. Please make sure you will have enough time to complete the training. If you must leave, you will need to re-register and start from the beginning.

All of the information discussed in this training is available in PDF form:

The investigation protocol presented in this training is specific to Coconino, Gila, or Maricopa County. If you have questions related to the investigation protocol specific to your county, please click here for a Children’s Justice Coordinator in your area.

After completing the training and the pre-/post-tests, Childhelp will email your certificate of completion.

If you have any questions throughout the training, please contact your local Children’s Justice Coordinator.

If you would like to schedule a in person training for your organization please contact your local Children’s Justice Coordinator.

If you would like a copy of your pre- and/or post-test scores, you may request them by contacting the Info Center here.

If you are ready to take this 2-hour online course, click here to register. All of the information must be filled out in order to get a certificate of completion.

Who Are Mandated Reporters

There are four categories of mandatory reporters: peace offices and members of the clergy, parents, professional reporters, and anyone who has the responsibility for the care or treatment of a minor. “Professional reporters” include persons whose jobs or professions impose a duty to report information received during course of their employment, such as teachers, paraprofessionals, early child care workers, and other school personnel.

What to Report

Physical Abuse – includes any physical, threatened, or mental injury inflicted on a child by a person responsible for care of a child

Sexual Abuse – includes any act or threatening of criminal sexual conduct by a person responsible for the child’s care or by a person in a position of authority over a child

Emotional Abuse – includes any attitude or behavior with interferes with a child’s mental health or social development

Neglect – is the failure to provide a child with necessary food, shelter, clothing or medical care; the failure to protect a child from conditions or actions that seriously endanger the child’s physical or mental health when reasonably able to do so.

How to Report

Complete reports including the identity of the student, alleged offender, a description of the abuse or neglect, and the name and address of the reporter can be made confidentially to the following parties:

  • Child Protective Services
  • 24/7 Toll-Free Phone Line: 1-888-767-2445
  • Mail, within 72 hours, to: CPS, P.O. Box 44240, Phoenix, AZ 85064
  • Fax to: 602-530-1832
  • Online, non-emergency reports: www.azdes.gov/dcyf/cps/mandated_reporters
  • Local Law Enforcement
  • Local Law Enforcement Non-Emergency Line
  • 911
  • The Arizona Department of Education (if alleged abuser is certified by the State Board of
  • Education)
  • Phone: 602-542-2972
  • Mail, within 72 hours, to: Arizona State Board of Education, Investigative Unit, 1535 W.

Jefferson, Phoenix, AZ 85007

Failure to report

Reportable offense ARS 13-3620 (O) Sexual abuse- Class 6 felony, up to 2 years in prison & up to $150,000 in fines.

Reportable offenses of physical abuse and neglect – Class 1 misdemeanor, up to 6 months in jail & up to $2,500 in fines. 

MRT: http://childhelpinfocenter.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=135&Itemid=164

Arkansas

Child maltreatment means abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, sexual exploitation or abandonment by the caretaker of the child (a parent, guardian, custodian, or foster parent). The caretaker may be anyone who is age 10 or older and entrusted with the child’s care. Child maltreatment occurs when the caretaker harms the child or lets harm come to the child, or fails to meet the child’s basic needs. Sexual abuse and exploitation are child maltreatment under Arkansas law whether by a caretaker or by someone else.

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Who Reports Child Maltreatment?

Anyone who suspects child maltreatment may report. Some people (for example, doctors, teachers and school counselors) must, by law, report suspected child maltreatment.  If you need to report child maltreatment, please call the Crimes Against Children Hotline at 1-800-482-5964 or visit the following website from the Administrative Office of the Courts

MRT:  http://www.stoparchildabuse.com/

California

These guidelines are issued by the California Department of Education (CDE), in conjunction with the California Department of Social Services, to help all persons, particularly those persons who work in our children’s schools, to be able to identify signs of suspected cases of child abuse and/or child neglect and to have the tools to know how to make a report to the proper authorities.

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These guidelines are issued in conjunction with an extensive training module, specifically aimed at training school employees and educators on their obligations as mandated reporters of child abuse, which can be located online at California Child Abuse Mandated Reporter Training.

Telephone numbers for each county’s emergency response for child abuse reporting are located at California Emergency Response Child Abuse Reporting Telephone Numbers

On January 1st, 2015, Bill 1432 (D-Gatto) required all local educational agencies (LEAs) to train all employees each year on what they need to know in order to identify and report suspected cases of child abuse and neglect. “All employees” includes anybody working on the LEA’s behalf, such as teachers, teacher’s aides, classified employees, and any other employees whose duties bring them into direct contact and supervision of students.

A person who fails to make a required report is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and/or up to a $1,000 fine (California Penal Code Section 11166[c]).

Colorado

Mandatory reporters are required by law to report abuse, neglect, and exploitation (referred to as “mistreatment”) that is observed or that the reporter becomes aware of when that mistreatment is occurring to an at-risk elder or an at-risk adult with an intellectual or developmental disability (IDD).

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An at-risk elder is any person 70 years of age or older.

An at-risk adult with IDD is a person who is eighteen years of age or older who has an onset of an intellectual and developmental disability before the person is 22 years old. An adult with IDD has an I.Q. of 70 or below and/or has significant limitations in the ability to socialize, provide self-care, or communicate. IDD includes autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, developmental delays, Down Syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and other disorders.

If you knowingly make a false report or willfully fail to make a report of mistreatment it is a class 3 Misdemeanor.  If charged and convicted you could receive a fine of up to $750, or six months in jail, or both.

MRT:  https://co4kids.org/mandatoryreporting

Connecticut

Licensed health care providers are legislatively mandated reporters of suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation of certain groups of people. 

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Legislation in June Special Session Public Act 15-5, Section 480 includes new requirements regarding mandatory reporting of impairment for certain health professionals effective October 1, 2015.

Please click the following links for information regarding each of these groups:

Children; Persons with Disabilities; Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities; The Elderly; Impaired Practitioners

MRT: https://portal.ct.gov/DCF/Mandated-Reporter-Training/Home

Delaware

Delaware law mandates any person, agency, organization or entity to make an immediate oral report to the Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families, Division of Family Services, when they know of, or suspect, child abuse or neglect under Chapter 9 of Title 16 of the Delaware Code and to follow up with any requested written reports.

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Youth and Their Families, Division of Family Services, when they know of, or suspect, child abuse or neglect under Chapter 9 of Title 16 of the Delaware Code and to follow up with any requested written reports (16 Del. C. §903).

To report child abuse or neglect, see Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting or call  (800) 292-9582.

A mandated reporter who fails to report shall be liable for a civil penalty not to exceed $10,000 for the first violation, and not to exceed $50,000 for any subsequent violation.

No child who in good faith is under treatment solely by spiritual means through prayer in accordance with the tenets and practices of a recognized church or religious denomination by a duly accredited practitioner thereof shall for that reason alone be considered a neglected child.

When two or more persons who are required to report have joint knowledge of a known or suspected instance of child abuse or neglect, the telephone report may be made by one person with joint knowledge who was selected by mutual agreement of those persons involved. The report must include all persons with joint knowledge of the known or suspected instance of child abuse or neglect at the time the report is made. Any person who has knowledge that the individual who was originally designated to report has failed to do so shall immediately make the required report.

MRT: https://courts.delaware.gov/childadvocate/professionals/mandatoryreporting.aspx

Florida

In 2012, House Bill 1355 was passed into law and shall be referred to as “Protection of Vulnerable Persons” Ch. 2012‐155 of the Laws of Florida. 

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The bill adds to the current reporting requirements of 39.201, F.S removing the limitation that only “caregiver” abuse be reported to the hotline by requiring any person to report known or reasonably suspected physical or emotional abuse of a child by any adult person.

The bill also requires any person to report known or reasonably suspected sexual abuse of a child by any person.  The bill requires the central abuse hotline to accept any call reporting child abuse, abandonment, or neglect by someone other than a caregiver and to forward the concern to the appropriate sheriff’s office for further investigation.  The bill also states that “the knowledge and willful failure of a person, who is required to report known or suspected child abuse, abandonment, or neglect is elevated from a first degree  misdemeanor to a third degree felony. As a result, the potential prison sentence is raised from 1 year to 5 years, and the potential fine is raised from a maximum of $1,000 to a maximum of $5,000.  In addition, the bill creates subsections 39.205(3) and (4), F.S., which provide penalties for Florida educational institutions whose personnel fail to report certain child abuse taking place on the campus of the institution or during an event or function sponsored by the institution. The bill subjects the institution to a $1 million fine for each failure to report child abuse, abandonment, or neglect.”

MRT: https://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline/training.shtml

Georgia

Georgia states “No child who in good faith is being treated solely by spiritual means through prayer in accordance with the tenets and practices of a recognized church or religious denomination by a duly accredited practitioner thereof shall, for that reason alone, be considered to be an abused child.”

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Georgia has a specific list of people who must report, including “child service organization personnel.” That definition includes employees and volunteers with any organization that provides “care, treatment, education, training, supervision, coaching, counseling, recreational programs, or shelter to children.” Thus, organizations must train both their employees and any volunteers.

The statute requires a report to the Division of Family and Children Services. That agency has a statewide hotline at 1-855-GACHILD (1-855-422-4453).

Georgia requires a report no later than 24 hours “from the time there is reasonable cause to believe that suspected abuse has occurred.” That standard is lower than the old “reasonable cause” standard. Now, any time you even suspect abuse, you must report it.

Knowingly and willfully failing to report suspected abuse is a misdemeanor.

MRT: https://www.prosolutionstraining.com/.

Hawaii

Reason to believe that child abuse or neglect has occurred or there exists a substantial risks that child abuse or neglect may occur in the reasonably foreseeable future.

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Where does it go?

An initial oral report must be made to the Department of Human Services (“DHS”) or the police department. Telephone reports can be made by calling 808-832-5300 (Oahu) or 1-800-494-3991 (toll free – other islands). A written report to DHS must follow the telephone report. The written report can be mailed to DHS Child Welfare Services Intake Unit, 420 Waiakamilo Road, Suite 300A, Honolulu, HI 96817 or faxed to 808-832-5292 (Oahu) or 1-800-399-1614 (other islands). The form to be mailed or faxed can be found at: http://humanservices.hawaii.gov/ssd/files/2015/04/Mandated-Reported-Checklist-04-2015-4.pdf Whenever the reporting individual is a member of the staff of any public or private school, agency, or institution, that staff member shall immediately report the known or suspected child abuse or neglect directly to DHS or the police department and shall immediately notify the person in charge or a designated delegate of the report.

Anyone participating in good faith in the making of a report of child abuse or neglect shall have immunity from any liability, civil or criminal, that might be otherwise incurred or imposed by or as a result of the making of such report. Any such participant shall have the same immunity with respect to participation in any judicial proceeding resulting from such report. All reports to the department concerning child abuse or neglect made pursuant to this chapter, as well as all records of such reports, are confidential. Every reasonable good faith effort shall be made by DHS to maintain the confidentiality of the name of a reporter who requests that the reporter’s name be confidential. Any mandatory reporter who knowingly prevents another person from reporting, or who knowingly fails to provide the information required in the written report or fails to provide information requested by DHS or the police department related to the alleged incident of child abuse shall be guilty of a petty misdemeanor.

There is no online training provided for this state.

Idaho

Any person, including, but not limited to: Physicians; Residents on a hospital staff; Interns; Nurses; Coroners; School teachers; Day care personnel; Social workers; or Other person.

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A duly ordained minister of religion is not a mandatory reporter with regard to any confession or confidential communication made to him in his ecclesiastical capacity in the course of discipline enjoined by the church to which he belongs if: a) the church qualifies as tax-exempt under federal law; b) the confession or confidential communication was made directly to the duly ordained minister of religion; and c) the confession or confidential communication was made in the manner and context which places the duly ordained minister of religion specifically and strictly under a level of confidentiality that is considered inviolate by canon law or church doctrine. A duly ordained minister of religion is a person who has been ordained or set apart, in accordance with the ceremonial, ritual or discipline of a church or religious organization which has been established on the basis of a community of religious faith, belief, doctrines and practices, to hear confessions and confidential communications in accordance with the bona fide doctrines or discipline of that church or religious organization.

Report to proper law enforcement agency (i.e., city police department, prosecuting attorney of any county, state law enforcement officers or, the sheriff’s office of any county) or to the Department of Health and Welfare (“DHW”). The state-wide child abuse reporting hotline can be reached at 1-855-552-KIDS (5437); reports in Treasure Valley can be made to 208-334-KIDS (5437); reports can also be made to the telephone numbers for each county, which can be obtained at: http://www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Children/AbuseNeglect/ChildProtectionContactPhoneNumbers/tabid/475/Default.aspx

When the attendance of a physician, resident, intern, nurse, day care worker, or social worker is pursuant to the performance of services as a member of the staff of a hospital or similar institution, they shall notify person in charge of institution or his designated delegate who shall make the necessary reports.

There is no online training provided for this state.

Illinois

Everyone who suspects child abuse or neglect should call the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services Child Abuse Hotline to make a report, but Mandated Reporters are required by law to do so.

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The list also includes: supervisors and administrators of general assistance under the Illinois Public Aid Code. Other mandated reporters include social workers, social service administrators, substance abuse treatment personnel, domestic violence program personnel, crisis line or hotline personnel, foster parents, homemakers, recreational program or facility personnel, registered psychologists and assistants working under the direct supervision of a psychologist.

Any person who knowingly transmits a false report to the department commits the offense of disorderly conduct under subsection (a)(7) of Section 26-1 of the Criminal Code of 2012. A violation of this subsection is a Class 4 felony.” (Source: P.A. 97-189, eff. 7-22-11; 97-1150, eff. 1-25-13.)
Call the 24-hour Child Abuse Hotline at 800-25-ABUSE (800-252-2873 or TTY 1-800-358-5117) if you suspect that a child has been harmed or is at risk of being harmed by abuse or neglect.

MRT: https://mr.dcfstraining.org/UserAuth/Login!loginPage.action;jsessionid=6521FF896B90BD74D1268B9DAA3D0DC4

Indiana

Indiana goes a step further where any individual who has reason to believe that a child is a victim of child abuse or neglect must make a report.

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If you suspect or know of child abuse, sexual assault, or other maltreatment, contact the Indiana Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-800-5556 or call 911

A person who knowingly fails to make a report is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor. A person who intentionally communicates to a law enforcement agency or the department a report of child abuse or neglect knowing the report to be false commits a Class A misdemeanor. However, the offense is a Level 6 felony if the person has a previous unrelated conviction for making a report of child abuse or neglect knowing the report to be false. The person is liable to the person accused of child abuse or neglect for actual damages, and potentially punitive damages and attorney’s fees.

MRT: https://reportchildabuse.dcs.in.gov/

Iowa

In Iowa there are more types of abuse then in most states: Denial of critical care; physical abuse; presence of illegal drugs; sexual abuse; cohabitation with registered sex offender; manufacturing or possession of dangerous substance with intent to manufacture; mental injury; mhild prostitution; bestiality in the presence of a minor.

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Iowa law defines classes of people who must make a report of child abuse within 24 hours when they reasonably believe a child has suffered abuse. These “mandatory reporters” are professionals who have frequent contact with children, generally in one of six disciplines: Health, Education, Child care, Mental health, Law enforcement & Social work.

 

Call 1-800-362-2178. According to Iowa Code section 232.70, if you are a mandatory reporter of child abuse and you suspect a child has been abused, you need to report it to the Department of Human Services. The law requires you to report suspected child abuse to DHS orally within 24 hours of becoming aware of the situation. You must also make a report in writing within 48 hours after your oral report. The employer or supervisor of a person who is a mandatory or permissive reporter shall not apply a policy, work rule, or other requirement that interferes with the person making a report of child abuse. As a mandatory reporter, you are also required to make an oral report to law enforcement if you have reason to believe that immediate protection of the child is necessary.

 

Iowa Code section 232.73 provides immunity from any civil or criminal liability which might otherwise be incurred when a person participates in good faith in: making a report, photographs, or x-rays, performing a medically relevant test, or assisting in an assessment of a child abuse report.

 

Iowa Code section 232.75 provides for civil and criminal sanctions for failing to report child abuse. Any person, official, agency, or institution required by this chapter to report a suspected case of child abuse who knowingly and willfully fails to do so is guilty of a simple misdemeanor. Any person, official, agency, or institution required by Iowa Code section 232.69 to report a suspected case of child abuse who knowingly fails to do so, or who knowingly interferes with the making of such a report in violation of section 232.70, is civilly liable for the damages proximately caused by such failure or interference.

 

MRT: https://www.iwcc.edu/Continuing_Education/health_occupations/reporting.asp

 

Kansas

When is a report required?

Reason to suspect that a child has been harmed as a result of physical, mental or emotional abuse or neglect or sexual abuse.

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Where does it go? Reports made pursuant to this section shall be made to the Secretary of Social and Rehabilitation Services (the child abuse hotline (1-800-922-5330) or electronically at: https://prcform.dcf.ks.gov/kipslive/, except as follows: When the Kansas department for children and families is not open for business, reports shall be made to the appropriate law enforcement agency; Reports of child abuse or neglect occurring in an institution operated by the Kansas department of corrections shall be made to the attorney general or the secretary of corrections; Reports of child abuse or neglect occurring in an institution operated by the Kansas department for aging and disability services shall be made to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

 

Reports shall be made promptly. The report may be made orally and shall be followed by a written report, if requested.

 

In addition to those persons who are required to make a report, any person who has reason to suspect that a child may be a child in need of care may report the matter. When reporting a suspicion that a child may be in need of care, the reporter shall disclose protected health information freely and cooperate fully with the secretary and law enforcement throughout the investigation and any subsequent legal process. Willful and knowing failure of a mandated reporter to report suspected child abuse is a Class B misdemeanor. It is not a defense that another mandatory reporter made a report. Any person who willfully and knowingly makes a false report or makes a report that such person knows lacks factual foundation is guilty of a class B misdemeanor. Intentionally preventing or interfering with the making of a report required by this section is a class B misdemeanor. Anyone who, without malice, participates in the making of a report to the Secretary of Social and Rehabilitation Services or a law enforcement agency relating to a suspicion a child may be a child in need of care or who participates in any activity or investigation relating to the report or who participates in any judicial proceeding resulting from the report shall have immunity from any civil liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed.

Kentucky

As of June 29, 2017, Kentucky’s mandatory reporting law for victims of domestic violence has been changed to a mandatory information and referral provision.

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The revised law requires certain professionals to provide educational material to victims of domestic and dating violence with whom they have had a professional interaction. This law also requires these same professionals to make a report to police IF requested to by the victim and to report to police if they believe that the death of a victim may be related to domestic or dating violence. More information about this law can be found at:  https://www.kcadv.org/content/krs-209a-referral-information-professionals-and-law-enforcement

Any person who has reason to believe a child is dependent, neglected, or abused must report this to the Cabinet, the state or local police, or the local prosecutor’s office. Additionally, any child suspected of being trafficked must be reported to the Cabinet. This would include labor trafficking (procured through force, fraud, or coercion) or any instance in which a minor is involved in commercial sex activity (prostitution, participation in the production of obscene material or engaging in a sexually explicit performance). If a person 21 years of age or older commits an act of sexual abuse, sexual exploitation, or prostitution upon a child less than 16 years of age, that also must be reported to the Cabinet. The CHFS abuse hotline is: 1-877-597-2331

An oral or written report must be made immediately. If a written report is requested, it must be made within 48 hours of the original oral report.

Any person who intentionally fails to report suspected child dependency, neglect, or abuse is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor for the first offense, a Class A misdemeanor for the second offense, and a Class D felony for each subsequent offense.

Any health-care or mental health professional shall successfully complete a 3 hour training course that meets the requirements of the statute.

No online trainings for this state.

Louisiana

By law, all reports made orally by mandated reporters must be followed by a written report to DCFS within five days. This may occur either by entering a follow-up report online or by mailing CPI-2 form to the DCFS Centralized Intake Office.

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Person’s not required to report in most states but are required in Louisiana: Commercial film and photographic print processor, which is any person who develops exposed photographic film into negatives, slides, or prints, or who makes prints from negatives or slides for compensation; Appointed mediators; Appointed parenting coordinators; Court-appointed special advocates (CASA) volunteers under the supervision of a CASA program; School coaches, including, but not limited to, public technical or vocational school, community college, college, or university coaches and coaches of intramural or interscholastic athletics; and Organizational or youth activity provider, which is any person who provides organized activities for children, including administrators, employees, or volunteers of any day camp, summer camp, youth center, or youth recreation programs or any other organization that provides organized activities for children.

Reports of abuse or neglect where the abuser is believed to be a parent or caretaker, a person who maintains an interpersonal dating or engagement relationship with the parent or caretaker, or a person living in the same residence with the parent or caretaker as a spouse whether married or not, should be made through the designated state child protection reporting hotline telephone number (1-855-452-5437).

Any person who is required to report the abuse or neglect of a child who knowingly and willfully fails to report shall be subject to a fine of not more than $500 or imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or both. Any person who is required to report the sexual abuse of a child, or the abuse or neglect of a child which results in serious bodily injury, neurological impairment, or death of the child, and who knowingly and willfully fails to report shall be fined not more than $3,000, imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than 3 years, or both. Any person who is 18 years of age or older who witnesses the sexual abuse of a child and knowingly and willfully fails to report shall be fined not more than $10,000, imprisoned with or without hard labor for no more than 5 years, or both. Any person who makes a report knowing that such information is false shall be subject to a fine of not more than $500 or imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or both.

Any person who in good faith makes a report shall have immunity from civil or criminal liability that otherwise might be incurred or imposed. Immunity shall not extend to any alleged principal, conspirator, or accessory to an offense involving the abuse or neglect of the child or any person who makes a report known to be false or with reckless disregard for the truth of the report. Any person, any employee of a local child protection unit of the Department of Children and Family Services, any employee of any local law enforcement agency, any employee or agent of any state department, or any school employee who knowingly and willfully violates the provisions, or who knowingly and willfully obstructs the procedures for receiving reports of child abuse or neglect or sexual abuse, shall be fined not more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.

MRT: https://moodle.dcfs.la.gov/login/index.php

Maine

When is a report required?

Knowledge or reasonable cause to suspect that a child has been or is likely abused or neglected or that a suspicious child death has occurred.

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Knowledge that a child who is under 6 months of age or otherwise non-ambulatory exhibits evidence of any of the following: a bone fracture, substantial or multiple bruising, subdural hematoma, burns, poisoning, or injury resulting in substantial bleeding, soft tissue swelling, or impairment of an organ. Knows or has reasonable cause to suspect that a child is not living with the child’s family.

Where does it go?

All reports shall be made by telephone to the Department of Health and Human Services (1-800-452-1999). Deaf/Hard of Hearing – 711 (Maine Relay) A mandatory reporter, acting in a professional capacity, who knows or has reasonable cause to suspect that a child has been abused or neglected by a person not responsible for the child or that a suspicious child death has been caused by a person not responsible for the child, must immediately report or cause a report to be made to the district attorney’s office.

Must make oral report by telephone of suspected abuse or neglect immediately. If requested by the Department of Health and Human Services, must follow with a written report within 48 hours. Hospital, medical personnel and law enforcement personnel may submit emergency reports through password-protected e-mail. A faxed report may be accepted when preceded by a telephone call to the department.

Other Information

An employer may not take any action to prevent or discourage an employee from making a report. Failure of a mandated reporter to report suspected child abuse is a civil violation subject to a forfeiture of not more than $500. A person reporting in good faith is immune from any criminal or civil liability for the act of reporting. Good faith does not include instances when a false report is made and the person knows the report is false. A person participating in good faith in taking photographs or x-rays under these requirements is immune from civil liability for invasion of privacy that might otherwise result from these actions. No person may be discriminated against by any employer in any way for reporting in good faith.

MRT: https://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ocfs/mandated-reporters.shtml

Maryland

Who must report?

Health practitioner, police officer, educator, or human service worker, acting in a professional capacity in this State. Health care practitioner involved in the delivery or care of a substance- exposed newborn.

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Persons who are not health practitioners, police officers, educators, or human service workers are not required to report suspected abuse or neglect if doing so would violate the attorney-client privilege, if the report would require disclosure of “matter communicated in confidence by a client to the client’s attorney or other information relating to the representation of the client,” or if doing so would violate any constitutional right to assistance of counsel. The communication was made to the minister, clergyman, or priest in a professional character in the course of discipline enjoined by the church to which the minister, clergyman, or priest belongs; and the minister, clergyman, or priest is bound to maintain the confidentiality of that communication under canon law, church doctrine, or practice.

When is a report required?

Reason to believe that a child has been subjected to abuse or neglect. Reason to believe that a parent, guardian, or caregiver of a child allows the child to reside with or be in the regular presence of an individual, other than the child’s parent or guardian, who is registered under Title 11, Subtitle 7 of the Criminal Procedure Article based on the commission of an offense against a child; and based on additional information, poses a substantial risk of sexual abuse to the child.

Where does it go?

For health practitioners, police officers, educators, and human service workers acting in a professional capacity: Oral reports must be made by telephone or direct communication to the local department of social services or the appropriate law enforcement agency; and Written reports must be made to the local department of social services, with a copy to the local State’s Last Updated: December 2017 Written reports must be made to the local department of social services, with a copy to the local State’s Attorney. A list of the applicable phone numbers and addresses for reporting in each county can be found at: http://dhr.maryland.gov/child-protective-services/reporting-suspected-child-abuse-or-neglect/local-offices

For health practitioners, police officers, educators, and human service workers acting in a professional capacity: The oral report must be made by telephone or direct communication as soon as possible; and The written report must be made not later than 48 hours after the contact, examination, attention, or treatment that caused the individual to believe that the child had been subjected to abuse or neglect.

Any person who in good faith makes or participates in making a report of abuse or neglect or participates in an investigation or a resulting judicial proceeding is immune from any civil liability or criminal penalty that would otherwise result from making or participating in a report of abuse or neglect. An individual may not intentionally prevent or interfere with the making of a report of suspected abuse or neglect. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to imprisonment not exceeding 5 years or a fine not exceeding $10,000 or both.

MRT:  https://www.reportabusemd.com/training

Massachusetts

In his or her professional capacity has reasonable cause to believe a child is suffering physical or emotional injury resulting from abuse (including sexual abuse) which causes harm or substantial risk of harm to the child’s health or welfare; neglect (including malnutrition); physical dependence upon an addictive drug at birth; being a sexually exploited child; being a sexually exploited child; or being a human trafficking victim.

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Department of Children & Families (DCF) Child-At-Risk Hotline (1-800-792-5200) OR call the local DCF office in the relevant geographic area and ask for the “screening unit.” A list of local DCF offices and their phone numbers can be found at: https://www.mass.gov/files/child-abuse-reporting-form.pdf or http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/docs/dcf/can-mandated-reporters-guide.pdf.  Written reports should be faxed or mailed to the appropriate area DCF office (see https://www.mass.gov/files/child-abuse-reporting-form.pdf or http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dcf/child-abuse-neglect/reporting-abuse.html).

Must report orally immediately followed within 48 hours by a written report submitted to the DCF. If hospital personnel collect physical evidence of child abuse or neglect, the local district attorney and local law enforcement (in addition to DCF) should be notified immediately.

Failure of a mandated reporter to report a reasonable belief of child abuse can result in a fine up to $1,000. Whoever knowingly and willfully files a frivolous report of child abuse or neglect under this section shall be punished by: (i) a fine of not more than $2,000 for the first offense; (ii) imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than 6 months and a fine of not more than $2,000 for the second offense; and (iii) imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than 2 ½ years and a fine of not more than $2,000 for the third and subsequent offenses. Any mandated reporter who has knowledge of child abuse or neglect that resulted in serious bodily injury to or death of a child and willfully fails to report such abuse or neglect shall be punished by a fine of up to $5,000 or imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 2 ½ years or by both such fine and imprisonment; and, upon a guilty finding or a continuance without a finding, the court shall notify any appropriate professional licensing authority of the mandated reporter’s violation of this paragraph. A mandated reporter who has reasonable cause to believe that a child has died as a result of any of the conditions listed above in the “when is a report required” section shall report the death to the district attorney for the county in which the death occurred and the office of the chief medical examiner. Failure to do so shall be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000. Priests, rabbis, clergy members, ordained or licensed ministers, leaders of a church or religious body or accredited Christian Science practitioners do not need to report information solely gained or obtained through a confession or similarly confidential communication in other religious faiths. Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 119, §§ 21, 51A; ch. 233, § 20M.

MRT: https://51a.middlesexcac.org/

Michigan

Mandated reporters shall make an immediate report to CI by telephone or through the online reporting system, of suspected child abuse or child neglect.

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Within 72 hours after making an oral report by telephone, the reporting person shall file a written report (DHS-3200). If the immediate report has been made using the online reporting system, no additional written report is required.

Reporting the suspected allegations of child abuse and/or neglect to the head of the organization does not fulfill the requirement to report directly to DHHS. The verbal report can be completed by calling 855-444-3911

The identity of a reporting person is confidential under the Child Protection Law. The identity of a reporting person is subject to disclosure only with the consent of that person, by judicial process or to those listed under Section 5 of the Child Protection Law (MCL 722.625).

Failure to report will lead to Criminal penalties (93 days in jail, or fine $500.00, or both) and/or Civil penalties (liable for injuries, liable for future loss/damages).

MRT: https://mandatedreportertraining.carehouse.org/

Minnesota

The law requires mandated reporters to make a report if they know of or have reason to believe a child is being neglected or abused, or has been neglected or abused within the preceding three years. Verbal report must be made immediately (no longer than 24 hours). A written report must be submitted within 72 hours (weekends and holidays are excluded).

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If you know or suspect that a child is in immediate danger (such as a recent sexual assault or a serious physical assault) or the child is abandoned, contact your local law enforcement agency right away. Law enforcement officers can remove a child from a threatening environment to protect them.

A mandated reporter who negligently or intentionally fails to report is liable for damages caused by the failure. Nothing in MS 626.557 subd. 7 imposes vicarious liability for the acts or omissions of others. Additionally, an individual may be disqualified from providing direct contact services for failing to make a required report (MS 245C.15, subd. 4(b)). Facilities that fail to make mandated reports may be subject to a fine

Relevant statutes

  • The statute containing the definition of Child in Need of Protection or Services (CHIPS)
    [Minnesota Statutes 2012, section 260C.007, subd. 6].
    http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us

MRT: http://registrations.dhs.state.mn.us/WebManRpt/Who_CEP4.html

Mississippi

Any person, including, but not limited to, any: attorney; physician; dentist; intern; resident; nurse; psychologist; social worker; family protection worker; family protection specialist; child caregiver; minister; law enforcement officer; public or private school employee; or any other person is required to report suspected child abuse.

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If it is a life-threatening emergency, call the local law enforcement agency or 911. The Mississippi Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation Reporting System – Centralized Intake, Department of Human Services (1-800-222-8000 or 601-432-4570) or the online referral system: https://reportabuse.mdcps.ms.gov/

Must make the oral report immediately by telephone or otherwise, followed as soon as possible by a written report to the Mississippi Department of Human Services.

Willful failure to report suspected child abuse or neglect (if found guilty) shall result in punishment of a fine of up to $5,000 or imprisonment for up to 1 year, or both.

Any attorney, physician, dentist, intern, resident, nurse, psychologist, social worker, family protection worker, family protection specialist, child caregiver, minister, law enforcement officer, school attendance officer, public school district employee, nonpublic school employee, licensed professional counselor or any other person participating in the making of a required report pursuant to Section 43-21-353

[Reporting Abuse or Neglect] or participating in the judicial proceeding resulting therefrom shall be presumed to be acting in good faith. Any person or institution reporting in good faith shall be immune from any liability, civil or criminal, that might otherwise be incurred or imposed.

There is no online training for this state. 

Missouri

When any individual identified above has reasonable cause to suspect that a child has been or may be subjected to abuse or neglect or observes a child being subjected to conditions or circumstances which would reasonably result in abuse or neglect, that person shall immediately report.

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Reports are to be made immediately to the 24 hour, 7 day a week Child Abuse/Neglect Hotline telephone number (1-800-392-3738 or 1-844-CAN-TELL)

Reporter must make an oral report immediately, by telephone or otherwise. If the reporter believes that sexual abuse or molestation is occurring or has occurred, he or she must report immediately or within 24 hours (and send any evidence).

Failure to report is a Class A misdemeanor. Note that ministers do not need to report if a privileged communication is made to them in their professional capacity. Even if a child is not receiving treatment based on a religious belief, authorities may still accept reports of possible abuse or neglect and investigate to protect the child’s health.

A mandated reporter reporting in his or her official capacity as a staff member of a medical institution, school facility, or other agency, whether public or private, should notify the person in charge or a designated agent immediately. The person in charge or a designated agent shall then become responsible for immediately making or causing such report to be made to the division. However, this does not preclude any person from reporting abuse or neglect.

MO ST §§ 210.110, 210.115, 210.130, 210.165, 352.400

MRT:  https://protectmokids.com/

Montana

Knowledge or reasonable cause to suspect that a child is being abused or neglected. Cause for suspicion should be based upon “a perceived present real harm or a perceived present imminent risk of harm. This perception need not always be based entirely upon current, culpable acts of those responsible for the child.”

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The suspicion could be based on past acts, present acts, or both. Gross v. Myers, 748 P.2d 459, 462 (Mont. 1987).

Reports to be made promptly. No written report required.

Failure to Report Failure to report (or preventing another person from reporting) can result in civil liability for damages proximately caused by the failure to report; a person who purposefully or knowingly fails to report or prevents another from doing so is guilty of a misdemeanor. Dangerous Drugs Professionals in categories 1 and 2 above must report infants known to be affected by dangerous drugs (including, for example, opiates and hallucinogens). Members of the Clergy • Members of the clergy or priests are not required to report if: (1) the knowledge or suspicion came from a statement or confession made to him or her in his or her capacity as a clergy member or priest; (2) the statement was intended to be part of a confidential communication; and (3) the person who made the statement or confession does not consent to the disclosure. • In addition, a member of the clergy or a priest is not required to make a report if the communication is required to be confidential by cannon law, church doctrine, or established church practice.

MRT: https://www.childcaretraining.org/?pageid=84

Nebraska

Any person is required to report. Specifically any person with “Reasonable cause to believe a child has been subjected to child abuse or neglect or observation of a child being subjected to conditions or circumstances which reasonably would result in child abuse or neglect.”

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Whether or not “reasonable cause” exists within the meaning of the statute requires an “exercise of discretion and personal judgments.”

A local law enforcement agency (i.e., the police department or town marshal in incorporated municipalities, the office of the sheriff in unincorporated areas, or the Nebraska State Patrol) or the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services Adult & Child Abuse & Neglect Hotline (1-800-652-1999). The person who takes the initial telephone report will provide information regarding where the written report should be sent.

Timing is not specified. Telephone report must be followed by a written report.

Any person who willfully fails to make any report shall be guilty of a Class III misdemeanor. All reports of child abuse or neglect that are not classified under the statute (as court substantiated, court pending, or agency substantiated) will be maintained only in the tracking system of child protection cases and not in the central registry of child protection cases.

Neb. Rev. Stat. §§ 28-359, 28-710, 28-711, 28-717, 28-720, 28-720.01

There is no online training for this state.

Nevada

Reports should be made to the State of Nevada Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) (1-800-992-5757) or a law enforcement agency.

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(1-800-992-5757) or a law enforcement agency, unless (a) the reporter knows or has reason to believe that the abuse involved an act of an employee of DCFS, another agency providing child welfare services, or a law enforcement agency, in which case the person should report to an agency other than the one alleged to have committed the act or omission; or (b) the person directly responsible for, or serving as a volunteer for or an employee of, an institution or facility where the victim is receiving child care outside of her home for a portion of the day, in which case the abuse should be reported to a law enforcement agency.

As soon as reasonably practicable but no later than 24 hours. Reports are to be made by telephone or (given all the facts and circumstances known or which reasonably should be known) other means of oral, written or electronic communications that would be reliable and swift under the circumstances.

Knowingly or willfully failing to report is a misdemeanor. Note that employees of the DCFS and others will be guilty of a misdemeanor if they have reason to believe that a child who sought services from DCFS has been or is being abused or neglected and fail to report this.

N.R.S. §§ 432B.040, 432B.220, 432B.230, 432B.240, 433B.340, 433B.050

MRT: http://dcfs.nv.gov/Home/features/MandatedReporterTraining/

New Hampshire

A reporter is any physician, surgeon, county medical examiner, psychiatrist, resident, intern, dentist, medical & hospital personnel, Christian Science practitioner, school staff, social worker, law enforcement, clergy or any other person having reason to suspect that a child has been abused or neglected.

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New Hampshire Department of Health & Human Services (NH DHHS) Child Protection Services at 1-800-894-5533 (in-state only) or 603-271-6562; fax 603-271-6565 (8:00 am – 4:30 pm Monday – Friday).

Must report orally immediately by telephone or otherwise, followed within 48 hours by a written report, if requested by the NH DHHS. Do not send e-mail reports of abuse.

Anyone who knowingly fails to report shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 169-C:3, 169-C:29, 169-C:30, 169-C:37

 There is no online training for this state.

New Jersey

Any person having reasonable cause to believe that a child has been subjected to child abuse or acts of child abuse must report.

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Reports must be made immediately via telephone or online. Reports can be made to   Division of Child Protection & Permanency (formerly called the Division of Youth & Family Services) Child Abuse Hotline (State Central Registry): 1-877-NJ ABUSE – 1-877-652-2873) or local police. If the child is in immediate danger call 911.

Any person knowingly violating the provisions of this act, including the failure to report an act of child abuse having reasonable cause to believe that an act of child abuse has been committed is a disorderly person. If convicted of a disorderly person’s offense, a person will be subject to a $50.00 fine.

N.J. Stat. Ann. §§ 9:6-8.9, 9:6-8.10, 9:6-8.14, 2C:43-3.1.a(2)(a)

MRT:  https://reportingchildabusenj.org/

New Mexico

New Mexico law requires anyone with knowledge of suspected child abuse or neglect to report it to the appropriate authorities. This mandatory reporting applies to all individuals and is not limited to teachers or health care professionals.

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Section 32A-4-3 of the New Mexico Children’s Code mandates that anyone who has knowledge or a reasonable suspicion that a child is an abused or neglected child must report it immediately.  The report may be made to (1) a law enforcement agency; (2) the New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families Department; or (3) a tribal law enforcement or social services agency for any child residing in Indian Country. Merely reporting the incident to a supervisor or manager is insufficient.

New Mexico law broadly defines “abused child” and “neglected child” so that every action in which a child’s physical or mental health or welfare has been or may be adversely affected is potentially covered. If there is a question whether a child is an “abused child” or “neglected child” as defined by the law, always err on the side of the child’s safety and report the incident.

Any person who makes a report of child abuse or neglect is presumed to be acting in good faith under New Mexico law and shall be immune from civil or criminal liability absent an affirmative showing of bad faith or malicious purpose. Failure to report suspected child abuse or neglect is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment of up to one year and/or a fine of up to $1,000.

Report to a local law enforcement agency, the Children, Youth and Families Department (available at: https://pulltogether.org/support/keep-my-children-safe/child-abuse-neglect?/child-abuse-neglect) (1-855-333-SAFE / 1-855-333-7233), or a tribal law enforcement or social services agency for “any Indian child residing in Indian country.”

N.M. Stat. § 30-6-2, 30-6-4, 32A-1-4, 32A-4-2, 32A-4-3.

No online training but guidebook available: https://nmhealth.org/publication/view/guide/2188/

New York

Call 311 in NYC or the New York State Central Register (SCR) directly at 1(800) 342-3720. If the child is in immediate danger, call 911.

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The entire current list of mandated reporters can be found in Article 6, Title 6, and Section 413 of the New York Social Services Law. The website can be accessed online through the New York State Legislature’s Website (http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menuf.cgi).

Mandated reporters are required to report suspected child abuse or maltreatment when they are presented with a reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or maltreatment in a situation where a child, parent, or other person legally responsible for the child is before the mandated reporter when the mandated reporter is acting in his or her official or professional capacity.

Oral reports to the SCR from a mandated reporter must be followed within 48 hours by a written report to the local department of social services’ CPS unit on form LDSS-2221A.

If a call to the SCR provides information about an immediate threat to a child or a crime committed against a child, but the perpetrator is not a parent or other person legally responsible for the child, the SCR staff will make a Law Enforcement Referral (LER).

MRT: https://nyrequirements.com/course/child-abuse-new-york-mandated

North Carolina

Everyone has a duty to report in cases where there is suspected Child abuse and/or neglect by a parent, guardian, custodian or caretaker.

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  • Abuse, neglect or exploitation of a disabled or elder adult by their caretaker. 
  • Physicians and Hospitals must report to law enforcement certain kinds of wounds, injuries or illnesses. 
  • School Principals must report immediately to law enforcement when he or she has personal or actual knowledge that an act has occurred on school property involving certain offenses. 
  • Photo processors or computer technicians who, within the scope of their employment, come across images of a minor (or one who reasonably appears to be a minor) engaging in sexual activity. 

NCGS 7B-301(b) states that Any person or institution who knowingly or wantonly fails to report the case of a juvenile as required by subsection (a) of this section, or who knowingly or wantonly prevents another person from making a report as required by subsection (a) of this section, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

Reports should be made to the Director of the County Department of Social Services in the county in which the child or disabled adult resides or is found. Reports may be made orally or in writing.

MRT: https://www.safeschools.com/courses/child-abuse-mandatory-reporting-nc/

North Dakota

A report is required when knowledge of or reasonable cause to suspect that a child is abused or neglected, or has died as a result of abuse or neglect, if the knowledge or suspicion is derived from information received by that person in his or her official or professional capacity, or based on images of sexual conduct by a child discovered on a workplace computer.

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A member of the clergy is not required to report if the knowledge or suspicion is derived from information received in the capacity of spiritual advisor. Knowledge of or reasonable cause to suspect that a woman is pregnant and has used a controlled substance for a non-medical purpose during the pregnancy, if such knowledge or suspicion is derived from information received by that person in his or her official or professional capacity.

Report to county social service office.

Any act or failure to act by a person responsible for a child’s welfare which allows, permits or encourages a child to engage in prostitution, the obscene or pornographic photographing, filming, or depicting of the child for commercial purposes or otherwise or be subjected to other sexual abuses (such as rape, molestation or incest) constitutes child abuse and neglect and is subject to the reporting requirements (N.D. Atty. Gen. Op. No. 81-20). The procedures and standards for reporting, investigating, and treating all cases of medical neglect, including those in which parents refuse to provide medical care for religious reasons, are the same for all children, regardless of the religious beliefs or practices of their parents or guardians (N.D. Atty. Gen. Op. No. 93-01). Any person required by this chapter to report or to supply information concerning a case of known or suspected child abuse, neglect, or death resulting from abuse or neglect who willfully fails to do so is guilty of a class B misdemeanor.

Any person or official required to report may cause to be taken color photographs of the areas of trauma visible on a child suspected of abuse or neglect and, if indicated by medical consultation, cause to be performed imaging studies, laboratory tests, colposcopies, and other medical tests of the child without the consent of the child’s parents or guardian. All photographs and other visual images must be taken by law enforcement officials, physicians, or medical facility professionals upon the request of any person or official required to report. Photographs and visual images, or copies of them, must be sent to the Department of Human Services or the department’s designee at the time the initial report is made or as soon thereafter as possible.

MRT: http://www.pcand.org/NDDHS/mandatedreportertraining/who_must_report.html

Ohio

Make a report to the county public children services agency, or a municipal or county peace officer in the county in which the child resides or in which the abuse or neglect is occurring or has occurred.

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If the child is in a correctional center, make the report to State Highway Patrol.

Report must be made immediately by telephone or in person and must be followed by a written report if requested by the receiving agency or officer.

The law does not impose upon a professional counselor or licensed social worker the duty to report knowledge or suspicion of child abuse of an individual if, when the professional counselor or social worker learns of the child abuse, the individual no longer is a child under 18 or a mentally retarded, developmentally disabled, or physically impaired child under 21.

A violation of this statute is a misdemeanor in the 4th degree, except in certain circumstances where a violation is a misdemeanor in the first degree (relating to abuse by religious leaders, or where the child is under the direct care or supervision of the reporter).

 A person who violates the statute is liable for compensatory and exemplary damages to the child who would have been the subject of the report that was not made.

MRT: https://www.safeschools.com/courses/child-abuse-mandatory-reporting-ohio/

Oklahoma

Any person must report if they feel they have reason to believe that a child is abused or neglected. They may report to The Department of Human Services Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline (1-800-522-3511).

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They may report to The Department of Human Services Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline (1-800-522-3511) (http://www.okdhs.org/programsandservices/cps/default.htm). Reports must be made to the hotline in a prompt matter.

Knowingly and willfully failing to promptly report is a misdemeanor. No privilege or contract shall relieve any person from the requirements of reporting pursuant to the statute.

Okla. Stat. 10A § 1-1-105, 1-2-101

MRT:  https://www.ouhsc.edu/okcantraining/Online-Training

Oregon

A child is a person, married or unmarried, under the age of 18. “Child” also includes an 18, 19 or 20-year-old who lives in a child-caring agency (CCA) or receives care or services from a CCA.

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For a current and complete list of public or private officials who are mandatory reporters please refer to Oregon Revised Statute 419B.005 (3)

Reports can be made at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).

Guidebook:

AP_Mandatory-Reporting – Oregon.gov

No online training for this state is given.

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Department of Human Services’ Office of Children, Youth, and Families’ vision is for all children and youth to grow up in a safe, loving, nurturing and permanent family and community. Report child abuse by calling ChildLine at 1-800-932-0313.

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Mandated reporters are held to a higher standard of responsibility and can face serious consequences when they do not report suspected abuse. Mandated reporters can report abuse online. Failure to report will end a misdemeanor.

MRT: http://www.keepkidssafe.pa.gov/resources/training/index.htm

Rhode Island

Any person must report if they have reasonable cause to know or suspect that a child has been abused, been neglected, been a victim of sexual abuse by another child or has died.

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* If a physician, certified registered nurse practitioner or other health care provider is involved in the delivery or care of infants born with or identified as being affected by substance abuse or withdrawal symptoms resulting from prenatal drug exposure, or a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, or has cause to suspect that a child coming to him or her for examination, care or treatment is an abused or neglected child or when he or she determines that a child under the age of 12 has a sexually transmitted disease.

Reports of abuse, neglect, or sexual abuse by another child must be made within 24 hours. Reports of abuse or neglect resulting in death must be made immediately. Oral reports required to be made by a physician, registered nurse practitioner or health care provider, as described above, must be made immediately and followed by a report in writing to the department and law enforcement agency explaining the extent and nature of the abuse or neglect the child is alleged to have suffered.

Any person, official, physician or institution required to report or perform any other act who knowingly fails to do so or knowingly prevents any person acting reasonably from doing so shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, shall be subject to a fine of not more than $500 or imprisonment for not more than 1 year or both.

Any person who knowingly and willfully makes or causes to be made to the department a false report of child abuse or neglect shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than 1 year or both.

Any person, official, physician, or institution who knowingly fails to perform any act required by this chapter or who knowingly prevents another person from performing a required act shall be civilly liable for the damages proximately caused by that failure.

No training found online.

South Carolina

Requires that certain professionals report suspected cases of child abuse or neglect, because they have unique opportunities to observe and interact with children.

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The following professionals are mandated reporters of child abuse or neglect:

  • Healthcare professionals: physicians, nurses, dentists, optometrists, medical examiners or coroners or their employees, emergency medical services, mental health or allied health professionals
  • Educational professionals: teachers, counselors, principals, school attendance officers
  • Social or public assistance professionals: substance abuse treatment staff, childcare workers, foster parents
  • Legal professionals: police or law enforcement officers, juvenile justice workers, volunteer non-attorney guardians ad litem serving on behalf of the South Carolina Guardian ad Litem program or on behalf of Richland County CASA, judges
  • Undertakers, funeral home directors, or their employees
  • Film processors
  • Computer technicians
  • Clergy, including Christian Science Practitioners or religious healers (subject to laws governing privileged communication)

Mandated reporters must report abuse or neglect when, in their professional capacity, they receive information giving them reason to believe that a child’s physical or mental health has been, or may be, adversely affected by abuse or neglect.

A person who is required to report and fails to do so is guilty of a misdemeanor. Upon conviction, he or she may be fined up to $500 or imprisoned up to six months, or both.

Reports will go to Law enforcement and DSS.

No training found online.

South Dakota

Any person responsible for the rehabilitation or treatment of any adjudicated adult or juvenile is a mandated reporter.

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This includes Physicians; Dentist; • Doctor of osteopathy; • Chiropractor; • Optometrist; • Mental health professional or counselor; • Podiatrist; • Psychologist; • Religious healing practitioner; • Social worker; • Hospital intern or resident; • Parole or court services officer; • Law enforcement officer; • Teacher; • School counselor; • School official; • Nurse; • Licensed or registered child welfare provider; • Employee or volunteer of a domestic abuse shelter; • Chemical dependency counselor; • Coroner; and • Any law enforcement officer authorized to carry firearms and any custody staff employed by any agency responsible for the rehabilitation or treatment of any adjudicated adult or juvenile is a mandated reporter.

The required reports shall be made orally and immediately by telephone or otherwise to the state’s attorney of the county in which the child resides or is present, to the Department of Social Services or to law enforcement officers. Contact information is accessible at http://dss.sd.gov/cps/protective/reporting.asp.

Any person who intentionally fails to make the required report is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. • Any person who intentionally fails to make the required report is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. Any person who knows or has reason to suspect that a child has been abused or neglected may report that information.

MRT:  https://apps.sd.gov/SS60ReporterVideoTraining/Introduction.aspx

Tennessee

Tennessee law mandates reporting by any person who has knowledge of physical or mental harm to a child if: the nature of the harm reasonably indicates it was caused by brutality, abuse, or neglect; or on the basis of available information, the harm reasonably appears to have been caused by brutality, abuse (including sexual), or neglect.

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Call 911 if the situation is a life threatening emergency. In other cases, a report of child abuse or child sexual abuse must be made immediately to one of the following four authorities: The Tennessee Department of Children’s Services (reports can be made by calling the Central Intake Child Abuse Hotline at 1-877-237-0004); The sheriff of the county where the child resides; The chief law enforcement official of the city where the child resides; or A judge having juvenile jurisdiction over the child.

Failure to report will result in a Class A misdemeanor.

MRT: https://www.tn.gov/dcs/program-areas/child-safety/reporting/faqs.html

Texas

Texas law states that any person who believes that a child’s physical or mental health or welfare has been adversely affected by abuse or neglect must report it to Any local or state law enforcement agency, the Department of Family and Protective Services at 1-800-252-5400 or through https://www.txabusehotline.org

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adversely affected by abuse or neglect must report it to Any local or state law enforcement agency, the Department of Family and Protective Services at 1-800-252-5400 or through https://www.txabusehotline.org.

Failure to report is a Class A misdemeanor if the person has reason to believe that an elderly or disabled person has been abused, neglected or exploited or is in the state of abuse, neglect or exploitation. A Class A misdemeanor is punishable by fine not to exceed $ 4,000; confinement in jail for a term not to exceed one year; or both such fine and confinement.

Reports must be made immediately. Professionals, or those whose official duties require a license or certification and who in the normal course of official duties have direct contact with children, must report the suspected abuse no later than 48 hours after first suspecting the abuse.

MRT: https://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Training/Reporting/default.asp

Utah

Any person who has reasonable belief that a child is suspect to abuse or neglect must report to Utah Department of Human Services – Division of Child and Family Services (http://dcfs.utah.gov/), the nearest peace officer, or law enforcement agency.

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Utah Department of Human Services – Division of Child and Family Services (http://dcfs.utah.gov/), the nearest peace officer, or law enforcement agency.

Telephone report must be made immediately with a written report following within 48 hours.

Failure to report is a Class B misdemeanor and up to $1,000 in fines.

A parent or guardian legitimately practicing religious beliefs and who, for that reason, does not provide specified medical treatment for a child, is not guilty of neglect.

UT ST §§ 53A-6-103, 53A-6-502, 62A-4a-101, 62A-4a-403, 62A-4a-405, 62A-4a-408, 62A-4a-410, 62A-4a-411, 76-3-204, 76-3-301, 78A-6-105.

No online training.

Vermont

A mandated reporter is a professional that is responsible for the child at some point during the day (i.e., teacher, daycare, etc), a medical professional or social or mental health worker.  

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Must report within 24 hours of having reasonable belief that a child is being abused or neglected.

Failure to report can result in a fine of not more than $500. A person who fails to report with the intent to conceal abuse or neglect of a child shall be imprisoned not more than six months or fined not more than $1,000, or both.

MRT: https://dcf.vermont.gov/dcf-blog/online-training-mandated-reporters-now-available

Virginia

Reports are made to Child Protective Services (804-786-8536) or the toll free child abuse hotline 1-800-552-7096. You can visit the website for more information about Mandatory Reporters. https://www.dss.virginia.gov/

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Reports are made to Child Protective Services ((804) 786-8536) or the toll free child abuse hotline 1-800-552-7096. If an employee of the local department of child protective services is suspected of abusing or neglecting a child, the complaint shall be made to the court of the county or city where the abuse or neglect was discovered.

Reports must be made immediately, or no later than 72 hours after first suspicion of abuse. • If the information is received by a teacher, staff member, resident, intern or nurse, or emergency medical services personnel, in the course of professional services in a hospital, school or similar institution, such person may, in place of said report, immediately notify the person in charge of the institution or department, or his designee, who shall make such report forthwith.

Any person required to file a report pursuant to this section who fails to do so within 72 hours of his first suspicion of child abuse or neglect shall be fined not more than $500 for the first failure and for any subsequent failures not less than $100 nor more than $1,000.

MRT:  http://dss.virginia.gov/abuse/mr.cgi

Washington

Those people legally required to report child abuse or neglect are to report to Child Protective Services in their region.

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Dentists, Social service counselors/therapists, Psychologists, Medical examiners, Pharmacists, School personnel, Child care providers, Law enforcement officers, Juvenile probation officers, Corrections employees, DSHS employees, DCYF employees, Placement and liaison specialists, Responsible living skills program staff, HOPE center staff,  State family and children’s ombudsman, Any volunteer in the ombudsman’s office, Adults residing with child suspected to have been severely abused.

Report to Child Protective Services in your region.

MRT: https://www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/home-and-community-services/mandatory-reporter-training-topics

Washington DC

CFSA takes reports of child abuse and neglect 24 hours a day, seven days a week at (202) 671-SAFE or (202) 671-7233.

You can visit their website here: https://cfsa.dc.gov/service/report-child-abuse-and-neglect

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When you call, a trained hotline worker will ask you for:

  • The name, address, age, and gender of the child.
  • Who is caring for the child and whether other children live in the home.
  • The nature and extent of the abuse or neglect, as you know it—and any previous abuse or neglect you know about.
  • Any additional information that may be helpful.

Friends, neighbors and other community members can help to protect child by being aware and working together.

Some people in specific professions are called mandated reporters—people DC law requires to report whenever they know or suspect a child is experiencing abuse or neglect. Because these individuals regularly work with children, they are often the first to see signs of maltreatment. In DC, people in the following professions are mandated reporters:

  • Athletic coaches
  • CFSA employees and contractors
  • Child care workers
  • Chiropractors
  • DC Parks and Recreation employees
  • Dentists
  • Domestic violence counselors
  • Human trafficking counselors
  • Humane officers (animal cruelty)
  • Law enforcement officers
  • Medical examiners
  • Mental health professionals
  • Nurses (LPNs and RNs)
  • People caring for or treating patients
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Public housing resident managers
  • School officials
  • Social service workers
  • Teachers

DC mandated reporters can take free training on line at dc.mandatedreporter.org. The comprehensive course covers your legal obligations, types and signs of child abuse and neglect, when and how to report, and other important topics.

West Virginia

Any medical, dental, or mental health professional, Christian Science practitioner, religious healer, school teacher or other school personnel, social service worker, social worker, clergy shall immediately, and not more than 24 hours after suspecting this abuse or neglect, report the circumstances to the Department of Health and Human Resources.

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child care or foster care worker, emergency medical services personnel, peace officer or law-enforcement official, humane officer, member of the clergy, circuit court judge, family court judge, employee of the Division of Juvenile Services, magistrate, youth camp administrator or counselor, employee, coach or volunteer of an entity that provides organized activities for children, or commercial film or photographic print processor who has reasonable cause to suspect that a child is neglected or abused, including sexual abuse or sexual assault, or observes the child being subjected to conditions that are likely to result in abuse or neglect shall immediately, and not more than 24 hours after suspecting this abuse or neglect, report the circumstances to the Department of Health and Human Resources.

 County boards of education and private school administrators shall provide all employees with a written statement setting forth the requirements contained in this section and shall obtain and preserve a signed acknowledgment from school employees that they have received and understand the reporting requirement.

Nothing in this article is intended to prevent individuals from reporting suspected abuse or neglect on their own behalf. In addition to those persons and officials specifically required to report situations involving suspected abuse or neglect of children, any other person may make a report if that person has reasonable cause to suspect that a child has been abused or neglected in a home or institution or observes the child being subjected to conditions or circumstances that would reasonably result in abuse or neglect.

No online training

Wisconsin

Wisconsin law requires that any mandated reporter who has reasonable cause to suspect that a child seen by the person in the course of professional duties has been abused or neglected, or who has reason to believe that a child seen by the person in the course of professional duties has been threatened with abuse or neglect and that abuse or neglect of the child will occur, make a report to county CPS or law enforcement.

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In addition, Wisconsin law (175.32) requires that any mandated reporter who believes in good faith, based on a threat made by an individual seen in the course of professional duties regarding violence in or targeted at a school, that there is a serious and imminent threat to the health or safety of a student or school employee or the public, make a report to law enforcement.

A person who is mandated to report suspected child abuse or neglect will be informed by the county what action, if any, was taken to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the child who is the subject of the report.

Penalty: Persons required to report, who intentionally fail to report suspected child abuse or neglect or threats of school violence may be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned up to 6 months or both.

List of mandated reporters: https://www.rainn.org/pdf-files-and-other-documents/Public-Policy/Legal-resources/2009-Mandatory-Report/Wisconsin09C.pdf

MRT: https://media.wcwpds.wisc.edu/mandatedreporter/

Wyoming

Any person with knowledge or reasonable cause to believe or suspect that a child has been abused or neglected or who observes any child being subjected to conditions or circumstances that would reasonably result in abuse or neglect is required by law to report to Local office of the Department of Family Services/local child protective agency (http://dfsweb.wyo.gov/social-services/child-protective-services) or local law enforcement agency.

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Report must be made immediately either orally or in writing. If a person reporting child abuse or neglect is a member of the staff of a medical or other public or private institution, school, facility or agency, such person must notify the person in charge as soon as possible (who is thereupon responsible to make the report). If the person responsible for the welfare of the child is a member of the armed forces, report should be made to the state judge advocate for the Wyoming military department.

Any person who knowingly and intentionally makes a false report of child abuse or neglect, or who encourages or coerces another person to make a false report of child abuse or neglect, is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 6 months, a fine of not more than $750, or both.